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Recent Blog Posts

  • Myths, rumors and clarification on the status of the H-4 EAD By Rob Cohen    In February of this year, USCIS announced that the proposed rule to eliminate the ability of foreign nationals in H-4 status to apply for an Employment Authorization Document (EAD) was sent to the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) for final approval. Five months later, OMB has still not released the proposed rule for publication. The delay likely reflects substantive issues and is more than mere bureaucratic delay. In the meantime, the H-4 EAD is alive and well.... More
  • EEO-1 reporting: Pay data filing begins July 15, 2019 By Jourdan Day     The Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) has announced the filing window for the newly required Component 2 pay data opens July 15, 2019. Private employers with at least 100 employees are required to submit pay data for calendar years 2017 and 2018 by Sept. 30, 2019. This new requirement is ordered by the court decision in the National Women’s Law Center v. Office of Management and Budget case. The EEOC has taken a number of steps to assist employers... More
  • #MeToo: Looking to best teaching practices for effective training By Jyllian Bradshaw    When did canned web-based presentations become the norm for harassment, discrimination and other inappropriate workplace conduct training? Companies who rely on pre-prepared, generic materials often find those trainings for HR, management, supervisors and employees to be ineffective, particularly now that #MeToo is a part of our vocabulary. For the employer who has the goal of efficient and effective HR trainings, it is helpful to look to best teaching practices. Educators know that teaching a lesson in a memorable... More
  • Are changes coming to the FMLA? By Rachel Burke    It has been a decade since the United States Department of Labor (DOL) made any changes to the FMLA regulations, but we now have an indication that the DOL is at least willing to consider issuing new regulations at some point in the next few years. The United States Office of Management and Budget announced that, by April 2020, the DOL will “solicit comments on ways to improve its regulations under the FMLA to: (a) better protect and... More
  • Applicants may be required to declare citizenship status when filing for Ohio workers’ compensation benefits By Rebecca Kopp Levine    The Ohio House of Representatives passed a two year $645 million workers’ compensation budget on June 5, 2019. As part of the budget bill, a provision was added that requires anyone who files an application for a workers’ compensation claim through the Ohio Bureau of Workers’ Compensation, to identify themselves as either a U.S. citizen, a noncitizen with permission to work in the country or an illegal alien or an unauthorized alien. All applicants may be eligible... More
  • Kentucky’s new pregnancy accommodation law goes into effect By Jourdan Day    Kentucky recently enacted the Pregnant Workers Act, which amends the Kentucky Civil Rights Act to provide accommodations to pregnant and lactating employees. The law goes into effect on June 27, 2019. Below are the important implications of the Pregnant Workers Act, which will affect employers that operate or maintain business locations in Kentucky. Who does the law cover? Covered employers are those that employ 15 or more persons during 20 or more calendar weeks in the current or preceding calendar... More
  • Multi-state employers: Be prepared for July 1 minimum wage increases By Jourdan Day    On July 1, 2019, the minimum wage will increase in several locations throughout the country. While the federal minimum wage has remained $7.25 per hour since July 2009, many states, cities and counties have adopted their own minimum wage laws which provide for a higher rate. In areas where minimum wage laws overlap, employees are entitled to receive the highest applicable rate. The following minimum wage increases will become effective July 1, 2019:   California Alameda, California: $13.50 per hour Berkeley, California: $15.59... More
  • United States Supreme Court makes it easier to get discrimination cases into court By Arslan Sheikh    The U.S. Supreme Court ruled recently that Title VII’s administrative exhaustion requirement – whereby an employee must file a claim with the EEOC prior to filing a lawsuit – is not a jurisdictional rule. This means that the employee’s failure to file a charge does not automatically mean the case cannot go to court. Instead, the employer must raise the “failure to file” issue as an affirmative defense and do so in a timely fashion. The case is... More
  • Supreme Court to determine if Title VII prohibits discrimination based on gender identity By Adam Bennett    This fall the Supreme Court will hear the case of EEOC v. R.G. & G.R. Harris Funeral Homes, in which it will decide whether Title VII prohibits discrimination on the basis of gender identity. The case is on appeal from a 2018 decision of the Sixth Circuit Court of Appeals.  EEOC v. R.G. & G.R. Harris Funeral Homes. In Harris Funeral Homes, a former employee of a funeral home was terminated after she transitioned from male to female.... More
  • Court ruling puts administration’s immigration policy on hold By Rob Cohen    On Friday, May 3, a Federal District Judge in North Carolina enjoined the Trump Administration’s effort to change the immigration policy on “unlawful presence” as it is applied to foreign students, in Guilford College et al. v. McAleenan, et. a.l. The concept of unlawful presence was first introduced into the immigration laws in 1996 to impose a penalty on those who remain in the U.S. after their authorized period of stay expires. This penalty, a bar, known as... More